ASEAN Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Certification and Control Manuals

The ASEAN Good Agricultural Practices (ASEAN GAP) is a voluntary standard for the production, harvesting and post-harvest handling of fruits and vegetables in the region. Its objective is to enhance ASEAN agricultural products quality and competitiveness on the international market as well as on the ASEAN market by promoting ASEAN GAP. In order to implement the ASEAN GAP, there is a need to establish a common certification and accreditation systems, which will provide reference for implementation and application of ASEAN GAP among stakeholders, including regulators, auditors, producers, and consumers in the region. These manuals defines such systems: The Official Control Manual. This “Preambles” document aims at giving the ASEAN Member States (AMS) wishing to implement the ASEAN GAP accreditation and certification systems an overview of the regulatory framework to study before the implementation. It also contains recommendations concerning national regulations contents and stakeholder’s organisation to insure equivalency between the AMS. The Certification Manual. This Manual serves as guidelines and references for the conduct of national GAP certification by Control Authorities or Control Bodies among the AMS with the aim of facilitating intra and extra regional trade of products originated from GAP certified farms. This Manual was developed based on the understanding that national regulatory and food safety requirements in each AMS which should take precedent. The notes and examples in this Manual aim to provide additional information intended to assist in understanding and use of the document. This Manual may also serve as one of the references for the development of Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) for inspection and certification systems on GAP production. Download the manuals here: ASEAN GAP...

Establishing multilateral power trade in ASEAN (2019)

The ASEAN member states have a long-standing goal to establish multilateral power trading in the region. To date, regional power trading has been limited to a series of uncoordinated bilateral cross-border arrangements. Multilateral power trading can bring multiple benefits, including reduced system costs, increased energy security and an ability to integrate higher shares of variable renewable energy. An examination of international experiences shows that it is possible to establish multilateral trading while allowing for stepwise and voluntary development and respecting local sovereignty. At the same time, increased cross-border integration and power trade does require increased co ordination and regulatory harmonisation. This report identifies a set of minimum political, technical and institutional requirements that the ASEAN member states will need to meet in order to establish multilateral power trading in the region. Some of these minimum requirements can be met by building upon existing efforts in the region. The report also proposes a set of trading arrangements of increasing levels of ambition which, taken together, will enable ASEAN to establish multilateral power trading in a manner that is consistent with maximising national sovereignty and the equitable sharing of benefits. These recommendations include a summary of potential roles for regional institutions and an example transaction to show how trading might potentially work in practice. This report was produced in collaboration with the International Energy Agency (IEA). Download the report (13MB,...

ASEAN Investment Report 2019 – FDI in Services: Focus on Health Care

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows into ASEAN increased for the third consecutive year in 2018, reaching an all-time high level of USD 155 billion. The region’s share of global FDI inflows also rose to 11.5 percent in 2018. This trend is expected to continue. Services sector is the largest recipient of FDI in ASEAN. The share of services sector in total FDI grew from 50 per cent in 1999-2003 to 66 per cent in 2014-2018. A significant part of FDI in services flows into financial services, wholesale and retail, and real estate activities. This year’s ASEAN Investment Report features the FDI in the services sector, with a special focus on health care. The Report looks in foreign investments and the Multi-National Enterprises (MNEs) in the healthcare industry in ASEAN, as well as the investment environment they thrive in. The Report also provides recommendations in moving forward to develop a competitive health care environment in the region. This report was produced in collaboration with UNCTAD. Download the...

ASEAN Sustainable Urbanisation Strategy

Urbanisation is a crucial driver of economic growth in ASEAN, yet rapid urbanisation can make it difficult for urban infrastructure development to keep pace, giving rise to issues such as economic inequality, congestion, and environmental and health problems. To maintain the benefit of urbanisation, ASEAN cities need to take a proactive, coherent approach in ensuring that adequate and sustainable urban infrastructure are in place. The ASEAN Sustainable Urbanisation Strategy (ASUS) is one of the initiatives under the strategic area of Sustainable Infrastructure of the Master Plan on ASEAN Connectivity (MPAC) 2025. It provides ASEAN cities with a framework of sustainable urbanisation based on six areas, namely civic and social, health and well-being, security, quality environment, built infrastructures, industry and innovation. It consists of this report as well as two accompanying toolkits that will assist local governments in ASEAN to advance sustainable urbanisation in their cities. Download the ASEAN Sustainable Urbanisation...

ASEAN Investment Report 2018: Foreign Direct Investment and the Digital Economy in ASEAN

ASEAN’s digital economy has been growing rapidly, backed by the region’s fast expanding digital networks and numbers of mobile phone and Internet users. ASEAN has the third largest number of Internet users in the world after China and India. The region’s active participation in digital development and promotion of investment in information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure are major drivers of this growth. The Internet economy (transactions conducted online) was estimated to be worth $50 billion in 2017 and is expected to become a $200 billion economy by 2025. Fulfilling this potential, however, will require the right policy and regulatory framework to encourage further participation and investment by the private sector. It also requires addressing key challenges and potential drawbacks associated with rapid growth of the digital economy. The ASEAN Investment Report 2018 looks at the how digital economy, including e-commerce, fintech, venture capital and other digital activities influence the investment landscape in ASEAN. It also discusses policy options and digital economy strategy for the region, to help it transform itself into a competitive global digital hub. The report also includes a special section highlighting Australia investment development in ASEAN. It provides historical analysis of Australian foreign direct investment (FDI) and discusses presence of Australian Multinational Enterprises (MNE) in ASEAN. The report was prepared by the ASEAN Secretariat and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). Download the report...

ASEAN at 50: a Historic Milestone for FDI and MNEs in ASEAN

In 50 years ASEAN has come a long way economically, in part because of the region’s deep participation in the world economy, including through inward and outward foreign direct investment (FDI). The level of FDI and the presence of multinational enterprises (MNEs) in ASEAN is formidable and will remain so in the future. This report tells ASEAN’s 50-year journey to becoming what it is now: a significant hub in MNE’s global production systems and value chain, and features how the enormous influx of FDI has driven economic growth, industrialisation and development across the region. The report also looks at the future of FDI and MNEs in ASEAN. Download the report...