Development of ASEAN Database on Trade Routes and Framework for Enhancing Supply Chain Efficiency

Status: Tendering. The OECD estimated the Southeast Asian nations’ combined gross domestic product (GDP) to continue to grow by 5.2% between 2019 and 2023 . ASEAN needs efficient logistics services to enable this growth and enhance its competitiveness. Trends such as e-commerce, urbanisation, and companies shifting their supply chains are accelerating demands for these services even further. An efficient region-wide logistics services network is needed to facilitate flow of goods, services and related information between producers, or from producers to consumers, anywhere in the region. Seamless logistics therefore has been a consistent priority for ASEAN since the last decade, and efforts have been made to reduce time and costs of transport and boost cross-border trade. Significant progress, such as the ASEAN Single Window (ASW) and work under the ASEAN Trade in Goods Agreement (ATIGA), have strengthen ASEAN’s logistics environment. Nevertheless, a number of challenges remain. The logistics sector in itself is complex, involving diverse stakeholders ranging from various government agencies to the private sector. Due to differences in countries’ stage of development with varying geographical characteristics, the trade structure and composition, each ASEAN Member States (AMS) has different priorities in facilitating trade and implementing the requisite infrastructure development and policy reforms for an efficient regional logistics services network. One way to help address the above challenges, specifically in identifying common priorities and promoting coherence, is assessing logistics services development needs based on regional trade routes and priority product groupings/commodities that would provide cross-border benefits across multiple AMS. Once trade routes and commodities are identified, detailed logistics information surrounding them should be collected and analysed to identify bottlenecks and prioritise...

Global Megatrends: Implications for the ASEAN Economic Community (2017)

This publication aims to further increase awareness of key issues and drivers of global megatrends, and draw out their relevance and implications for the ASEAN integration agenda. It focuses on the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) and, more specifically, how the AEC may be impacted by and can respond to megatrends. The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) enters its second year of establishment in a changing world, partly driven by global megatrends. The transformative changes brought about by global megatrends do not happen overnight, but are rapid enough to warrant prompt anticipation.  The AEC Blueprint 2025 is envisioned to create a more dynamic and resilient ASEAN, capable of responding and adjusting to emerging challenges, including from global megatrends. In this new phase of economic integration, the AEC needs to be responsive in its policy processes. ASEAN and the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) have responded to changes in the wider region and at the global level. ASEAN, especially the AEC, will continue to respond to the global megatrends; the common themes and phenomena that are already unfolding, whose implications are broad, cross-cutting, profound and transformative, and would change the way individuals, businesses and societies live and do business for many years to come. Given the lasting impact of global megatrends, it is important for any community, including the AEC, to learn to adapt to, address and — to the extent possible — capitalise on them. Among the megatrends discussed in this book are: The political megatrends, specifically (i) geopolitics and security, (ii) geo-economics and the international liberal order, and (iii) national politics and the resurgence of populism. Technologies and the digital economy The interlinkages between...

Development of the ASEAN Mutual Recognition Arrangement for Tourism Professionals (MRA-TP) Work Plan 2017-2020

Status : Completed. The ASEAN Tourism Ministers (ATM) signed the Mutual Recognition Arrangement on Tourism Professionals (MRA-TP) on 9 November 2012 aiming at facilitating the mobility of tourism professionals within the region. In 2010, the ATM endorsed the MRA-TP Follow-up Implementation Requirements 2010-2015 covering the plan to establish MRA infrastructure and capacity development for members of related organisations under MRA-TP at the regional and national level. Several projects and activities were carried out under this Plan, including, among others, establishment of 242 toolboxes for all divisions under MRA-TP, establishment of pool master trainers and master assessors, the conclusion of Regional Secretariat of MRA-TP agreement, and finalization of the ASEAN Tourism Professionals Registration System (ATPRS). With most of the necessary regional infrastructure is in place, implementation of MRA-TP is now facing new challenges in operationalizing the instrument. Supporting Regional Secretariat of MRA-TP, maintaining and updating regional infrastructure, increasing the “buy-in” of MRA-TP, enhancing quality assurance of MRA-TP and recognition of prior learning mechanism are among those challenges faced at the regional level. While, at national level, challenges are also faced particularly on national regulations, establishment of national trainers and assessors, and certification mechanisms. There is a need to assess the progress of implementation to date and systematically identify these challenges, identify risks and opportunities, and develop a well-informed, results-oriented work plan that will guide the ASEAN Tourism Professional Monitoring Committee (ATPMC) in taking strategic actions to promote implementation of the MRA-TP. This project had two outputs: a) the ASEAN MRA-TP implementation review, which assessed current progress in the implementation of the MRA-TP, tested assumptions, captured relevant context, identified risks (magnitude...

Third Regional Consultation on Models for Mutual Recognition of ASEAN Agricultural Best Practices

The third regional consultation meeting on models for Mutual Recognition of ASEAN agricultural best practices held on 21 to 22 March 2017 at the ASEAN Secretariat involving representatives from ASEAN Sectoral Working Group on Livestock (ASWGL), the ASEAN Sectoral Working Group on Fisheries (ASWGFi) and the Expert Working Group Meeting on ASEAN’s Good Agricultural Practices (EWG-GAP) as well as representatives from ASEAN Secretariat’s Divisions; Standard and Conformance Division, ASEAN Integration (IAI) and Narrowing the Development Gap Division and ASEAN Integration Monitoring Directorate. At the two-days meeting, representatives discussed and provided feedbacks to key elements of the preferred model option for mutual recognition; and examined its advantages and impact on trade and farm. The meeting also explored the format of an MRA and best ways forward for its implementation. At the forum, the representatives of Standard and Conformance Division; ASEAN Integration (IAI) and Narrowing the Development Gap Division shared the progress on Mutual Recognition Arrangement in other sectors and current works in the capacity development of CLMV countries in the implementation of ASEAN standards in crops, livestock, and fisheries. The final proposed model will be presented to Senior Officials Meeting of the ASEAN Ministers on Agriculture and Forestry (SOM-AMAF) on August...

Best Practices for Investment Promotion and Facilitation in ASEAN: General Paper

In order for ASEAN to enhance its attractiveness as an investment destination as envisioned in the AEC Blueprint 2025, ASEAN needs to boost its effort in investment promotion and facilitation. This paper aims to provide ASEAN Member States with a deeper understanding of regional and global ‘best practices’ in investment promotion and facilitation.  This deeper understanding may be used to guide current or future initiatives, whether at the regional, national or sub-national level, in order to facilitate freer flow of capital and investment. Specifically, this paper identifies best practices and lessons learned in the four core functions of Investment Promotion Agencies (IPAs): promotion, attraction, facilitation and aftercare. It proposes and examine opportunities for development of practical initiatives in two areas that are potential areas for practical initiatives by AMS: 1) Formal & Informal Ambassadorial and cultural networks; and 2) private sector partnerships. Separate reports on each of these areas are available through the Services and Investment Division of the ASEAN Secretariat. Download: Best Practices for Investment Promotion and Facilitation in ASEAN: General Paper  ...

ASEAN Leaders adopt Master Plan on Connectivity 2025

ASEAN Leaders adopted the Master Plan on ASEAN Connectivity 2025 (MPAC 2025) on 6 September 2016 in Vientiane, Lao PDR. The MPAC 2025 focus on five strategic areas: sustainable infrastructure, digital innovation, seamless logistics, regulatory excellence and people mobility seeks to add value by complementing and synergising the ASEAN Community Blueprints 2025, ASEAN sectoral work plans, and the Initiative for ASEAN Integration (IAI) Work Plan III, as well as enhancing synergies with other sub-regional and inter-regional frameworks. The MPAC 2025, which succeeds the Master Plan on ASEAN Connectivity 2010, was developed taking account the results of the MPAC 2010 implementation review along with the feedbacks from relevant ASEAN Sectoral Bodies and other stakeholders, with the support from ASEAN Australia Development Cooperation Programme II (AADCP II). The Master Plan is available for download here Watch the MPAC 2025 video...